American Computer and Robotics Museum

0100100001000101010011000100110001001111, 01000100010000010100100001001100 01001001010011100100011101010011!

… that’s “HELLO, DAHLINGS!” in binary code. I didn’t realize that I was shouting it at you until I was almost done, so we’ll just let it be and call it “enthusiastic.”

Anyway… 2017, people! Holy crap! Make the most of it. Set some high goals. Do something bold, something new, something you wouldn’t dare do in 2016. Use this year to take a stand, create a legacy, and leave an imprint on modern history.

…like the folks featured in today’s stop, the AMERICAN COMPUTER AND ROBOTICS MUSEUM– 2023 Stadium Dr. Unit 1-A, Bozeman, MT.

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Upon first entering the neighborhood, you may, like me, think you took a wrong turn. It is in an area that can best be described as a medical clinic park, where all the buildings look the same and different offices are in suites.

However, one should never judge a book by its cover… or a smartphone by its Otterbox color. This museum has plenty of informative displays and exhibits.

And it’s FREE! Remember, folks, the best things in life usually are!

The museum has several exhibits of things you would expect in such a museum, and some you wouldn’t.

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Tablets: then and now.
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Telephone history

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Robby the Robot, probably recognizable to any Forbidden Planet fans.

They also have exhibits on television and, interestingly enough, brains (nature’s computer essentially).

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The pink thing is a mold of a dinosaur brain (taken from a mold made of a dinosaur skull cavity)

My favorite section is the newest exhibit called Hacking Hitler’s Code: The Secret German Enigma Machine.

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Those of you who have seen The Imitation Game know what this is. For those of you who haven’t seen it, GO SEE IT NOW! This movie is awesome! Even if it DOES have Kiera Knightly in it, she’s forgivable this time!

Basically, the Enigma Machine was created by the Germans during World War II to send encrypted messages. The Allies, namely the Poles and the Brits, were able to intercept these messages, but due to the complexity of the encryption and its constantly changing basic formula, they had a devil of a time deciphering it. How did they do it? Go see The Imitation Game. I also can recommend watching Bletchley Park, a series put out by the BBC. All of this information is coming out now because the files on this were released to the public only within the past few years; only until recently were those involved with these missions of code-breaking allowed to actually admit it.

The one issue I have with the museum is the fact that the exhibit order they recommend is hard to follow, but the museum is thorough and interesting enough that it is not a real issue. You will still get plenty out of it.

Until next time, dahlings…

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